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    Any proof that @joncard is Jonathan Card? ( ͡º ͜ʖ͡º) No pictures or something, @joncard is 5-day account and people believe him...

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    @joncard: By the way... What is the 27th month of the year? ( ͡º ͜ʖ͡º) Do you use metric system in science? ( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)

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      @Zashi: Weird fact, Fahrenheit is based on the freezing point of salt water in the bay near the inventor's house, and the body temperature of a cow, taken rectally. Do with that as you will, but not entirely arbitrary.

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    Istnieje nowy typ kosmicznego silnika nazywany EmDrive, który skonsternował naukowców na całym
    świecie. Zbieram fundusze na stronie http://www.buildanemdrive.org, żeby wysłać taki silnik na orbitę, w
    celu zweryfikowania czy naprawdę będzie działał.

    FYI: istnieją śmieszne zasady dotyczące tego ile można powiedzieć o takich rzeczach dla obywateli spoza
    USA. Dołożę wszelkich starań, aby powiedzieć najwięcej ile mogę.

    Ponieważ nie znam języka polskiego będę odpowiadał w języku angielskim. Uprzejmie proszę tych
    wykopowiczów, którzy znają język angielski o zadawanie mi pytań w języku angielskim, w przeciwnym
    razie będę musiał używać Google translatora co może być niezbyt efektywne i niezawodne.

    Doceniłbym jeśliby się znaleźli ochotnicy, którzy pomagaliby w tłumaczeniu pytań i odpowiedzi.

    There is a type of spacecraft engine called an EMDrive that has baffled scientists around the world. I am
    raising money to put one into orbit and see if it really works at http://buildanemdrive.org.

    FYI: there are funny rules about talking about these things to non-US citizens. I will do my best to say as
    much as I can.

    Because I do not know Polish I will be replying in English. I kindly request those Wykop users who know
    English to ask me questions in English, otherwise I would have to use Google Translator, which may not
    be an effective and reliable way to translate.

    I would appreciate if there would be volunteers willing to help in the translation of questions and answers.

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    I think, an Army has got that technology for many years, or maybe even better technology as Top Secret, but today ordinary people discovered it independently recently. They think it is new technology, but it is older than they think ( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)

    pokaż spoiler Smutni Panowie już po mnie jadą.

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      @mirkometr: I would not be surprised. One of the things that I have struggled with is, when I try to go the public for funding, they say, "that can't work." When I talk to some seasoned professionals, they say, "Oh, I saw that work back in the 80's; of course it works."

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    Nie trzeba. Nasa i Chiny już to sprawdzają.

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    I don't know how to do the verification

    @joncard: That's enough! Thanks!

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      @Zashi: :) I use the metric system when I can, but it's difficult to get parts in metric in the United States. Sites like mcmaster.com and mouser.com don't usually stock metric parts, so I'm constantly going back and forth because I hate working in fractions.

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    Maybe you should contact Elon Musk, he is sceptic to emdrive, but new evidence that this thing is working may convice him.

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      @Norwag93: I actually did contact Burke Fort, the head of the SpaceX Foundation. I used to do some volunteer work for him a few years ago. He gave me some good advice. Maybe I will give him another call now that the Chinese have made it work in space.

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    @joncard: What about Jean Luc Piccarde does he know that you are trying to violate prime directive?;]

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    Why Poland cannot into space :(

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    @joncard

    Do you also plan to test second generation of the EMdrive?

    What is your scientific/engineering experience?

    How do you want to measure thrust/orbit change in space?

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      @dzikiknur: The second generation is very interesting, and I have looked into how much and how difficult YBCO is to machine, but I do not think I am up to it.

      I have a degree in Computer Science and most of my career has been in computers, but I served for a while as Treasurer and then Executive Director of the Space Frontier Foundation, a group that advocates for space settlement and compatible policies. During that time, I was very involved with a lot of space-oriented technologies and companies, and the contacts I made there have been very helpful in this process.

      My plan is to partner with and observatory or other group that has a radio telescope and measure the doppler effect as the craft turns on. This means there needs to be a minimum acceleration to be detectable (but I don't remember how much off the top of my head). I don't know if I should trust on-board accelerometers, but I expect to have them. I would like third-party verification.

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    @joncard What size of satelite you want to build?

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      @krzychu3: I am planning on a 3U CubeSat, though it is looking like it will go up to 6U because of the temperature management. It's not really clear yet; my current budget should cover either one, though if it goes up to 6U I will have to take a different, more difficult launch option.

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      @tomekamila: I don't make anything from this project, I can only contribute some from my paycheck from my day job. The only way I expect to make money from this is if I get a grant from someone like NASA; then I'd consider taking a salary from that.

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    @joncard: How would you know, does your emdrive really work in space? Apart from emdrive, what other equipment do you plan to put inside your cubesat? Do you have any experience in building satellites or anything like that? I mean, if you plan to use part from your microwave, it may not work in space.

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      @schwanz: I do not have a lot of experience building satellites myself, but I have worked with people who do have that experience for years. I am making sure with them that what I am doing makes sense and can work.

      I expect to put in accelerometers to detect spin or tumble, something to correct that (either reaction wheels or a magnetorquer) and a control board that I have not designed yet. I think that I can work with a modified Raspberry Pi board.

      The biggest worry about things not working in space are 1. radiation corrupting the electronics, 2. freezing, 3. pockets of air causing pieces to explode, and 4. the "shake and bake": the shaking during launch. I have a plan for the electronics that is not really fully hatched yet. The cold is a problem; I will probably have to put a heater or something and make sure the device is insulated, air pockets are a big concern, and the launch is just going to have to dealth with.

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    @joncard: On this video he turned emdrive and scale still varies but in the opposite direction so "baloon theory" is wrong.

    źródło: youtube.com

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    @joncard: Do you plan any system to control orientation of satelite, reaction wheels or smal thrusters?

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      @krzychu3: Yes. The details of it are not fully worked out; I want to get a working frustum first, but my expectation is at least 2 reaction wheels to stop a tumble. Possibly a magnetorquer instead; the reaction time doesn't need to be fast. It just needs to stop a tumble before turning on the drive so that thrust can be detected.

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    Hmm, to ja może się przywitam.

    HELLO ( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)

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    @joncard: What do you think about this video?

    źródło: youtube.com

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      @lord_mln: I believe that I have seen this before, so I'm going to reply while it is still playing. I have no idea. One of the concerns people have is that the hot air in the chamber could be providing buoyancy (think worst hot air balloon ever). This is definitely happening, it just doesn't seem to be all of the thrust we have seen. So, is he seeing thermal buoyancy? It doesn't seem like it; why would the thrust go down so quickly after he cuts power? I do not know, but it definitely was one of the things that convinced me that the project was potentially achievable.

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    Working with EM fields is pretty dangerous. Do you have any professional experience with such kind of engineering?
    Any details on your project? Planned EM frequency, resonance mode, frustum dimensions?

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      @Jossarian: I do not have a lot of experience with e & m, Which is why I am going slowly. I am building up a collection of sensors and safety equipment, like I recently finished building a Faraday cage is to the experiments in. I am also working with a lot of electrical engineers That also work in my makerspace where I am doing the work.

      Lack of experience is also dominating my choice of frequencies, etc. I am working with the 2.45 GHz band because there is a lot of equipment out there for microwave ovens, and because it is one of the few radio bands That the US Federal Communications Commission (FCC) does not regulate, it is also the band for Wi-Fi and a variety of other things. This Means that I am also looking at a TE or TM 10 mode, because there is not room for a bigger cavity. A lot of papers suggest That this is not the best, but if it's is good enough, that is good enough.

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    Zapytaj chińczyków, oni już obadali w przestrzeni kosmicznej, kilka dni temu.

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      @Kulek1981: I saw that. I am very excited to see it. It will definitely cause people to want a verification; there are a lot of people that do not trust the Chinese space program as it is very secretive.

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    Hello, thanks for Participating on That project and that you 'found the time to be able to tell us about your plans around EmDrive :)

    If may I ask:
    1. Has it been proven how it actually works? I mean about the laws around it. There were many hypotheses, formulas (dependencing of variables) describing it ... however any proofs - "just why"? Does it bend the laws of physics?
    2. How do you think - when the drive will become so popular That it will begin to be applied on the agenda? 3, 5, 15 years? Such inventions are of almost Implemented Immediately, others are taking a long, long time ...

    I hope that I'll see people flying to Mars using EmDrive and that future trips to Mars will be avaible on our lifetime :)

    Have a nice day!

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      @Atexor: The question of "does it work?" and "how does it work?" are extremely different questions that a lot of people are getting confused right now. The recent Eagleworks paper suggests that it does work. It is impossible to be sure until the experiment is run in space with no testing equipment around to interfere with it.

      The question of "how does it work?" is much more complicated. There are several hypotheses, including the team at Eagleworks saying that it works like a jetski's impeller, but through the zero-point field instead of water. And there is a theorist in England that says it works because of the way his theory of inertia interacts with metals. And the inventor has a different model. I think they only way to find out is to build a lot of them and see which set of equations fits what is actually happening with cavities of different shapes. There are also some experiments the Eagleworks paper suggested to me that might be able to tell us if that model is correct, even though it does not make a mathematical prediction.

      I think it is important to keep the two questions separate, though. We are willing to fly in airplanes, even though we do not really understand gravity, because we know that they work.

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    @joncard: Is there any analytical or/and numerical model describing electromagnetic field inside emdrive?
    Is there any approved formula how to calculate thrust of this device?
    Is it then possible basing on numerical analysis to develop optimized versions of engine?
    Will it be published in scientific journals or it's already new manhattan project now?

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    Well, you've gotta be real ingenious and wise to come up with an idea like this one. I suppose you were the one kid that everyone had in their class who knew the answer to any question the teacher had. Good luck with your project, buddy! ;-)

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    Czemu tu po angielsku piszecie?

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    @joncard: What is the upper frequency limit to EmDrive? Why can't you project EmDrive using some higher frequency EM waves like... light :) (Maybe naive question, but E=h*v, so if v [frequency] is higher, the energy is bigger). Are there any problems with higher frequencies? Maybe it needs much more precision then (which is unavailable for now)?

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      @ale_fuks: I do not know of any upper limit on the frequency. I do know that building the cavity in a frustum shape would be extremely difficult in the visible light range; it would possibly require building it into the crystal structure of a some mineral (the crystal that creates laser light is basically a resonance cavity that is made of a crystal instead of fabricated by hand). Dr. McCulloch has a proposed LEMDrive, which is not based on the EM Drive but rather his theory of how the EM Drive works. http://physicsfromtheedge.blogspot.com/2016/07/lemdrive.html

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    @Pimpuszek: Nie no, angielski znam na tyle, że mogę się porozumiewać bez większych problemów z graczami z teamów.
    Filmy z lektorem oglądam. Bo bez niego nie rozumiałbym 95% tego co mówią.

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    @joncard
    And another question, what about the power requirements for the EM-drive? Is the power from photovoltaic panels will be sufficient?

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      @dzikiknur: No, I don't think it will be enough. Solar power in space is about 1.3 kW / sq. meter, which is a lot of solar panel for a satellite in the form factor I am intending to work with. I am planning on a LiPo battery, which should be able to deliver 800 W at maximum discharge rate. I "just" need to figure out how to make it AC to feed it through a magnetron, or get much more complicated circuitry to emit a tightly tuned radio frequency.

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    Why EMdrive and new innovative "space" technology like this must be verified in space?

    [Dlaczego EMdrive i nowe kosmiczne technologie wymagają sprawdzenia w kosmosie?]

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      @MagicznyHubert: The fundamental rule of science is "believe what you see more than what you think." At least, I think it is. It is fine to say, "it works here on Earth", but what about all the things you did not know were affecting it by being in Houston, TX? If we do not try it in space, we can never really know if it works in space.

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    ''Istnieje nowy typ kosmicznego silnika nazywany EmDrive, który skonsternował naukowców na całym
    świecie. Zbieram fundusze na stronie http://www.buildanemdrive.org, żeby wysłać taki silnik na orbitę, w
    celu zweryfikowania czy naprawdę będzie działał.

    FYI: istnieją śmieszne zasady dotyczące tego ile można powiedzieć o takich rzeczach dla obywateli spoza
    USA. Dołożę wszelkich starań, aby powiedzieć najwięcej ile mogę.

    Ponieważ nie znam języka polskiego będę odpowiadał w języku angielskim. Uprzejmie proszę tych
    wykopowiczów, którzy znają język angielski o zadawanie mi pytań w języku angielskim, w przeciwnym
    razie będę musiał używać Google translatora co może być niezbyt efektywne i niezawodne.

    Doceniłbym jeśliby się znaleźli ochotnicy, którzy pomagaliby w tłumaczeniu pytań i odpowiedzi.''

    Tutaj napisane bardzo poprawną polszczyzną i nie używałeś do tego Google tra. A słowa -w przeciwnym razie bedę musiał używać Google translatora zabrzmiało jak pogróżka! Czemu strasznie mi sie tu coś nie zgadza? Widzę znasz Wykop więc pewnie wiesz , że większość nie pisze po angielsku i rozpoczynając AMA mogłeś najpierw postarać się o tłumacza. Pewnie go masz ,bo jak?- Czytając Wykopa tłumaszysz go Googlem? Może mam omamy po Świątecznym obżarstwie ale sorki-za nic Ci nie wierzę.

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      @HHSbits: The introduction was written by a volunteer with the organization. Unfortunately, I was not able to arrange for a translator other than Google Translator today. I will try for more support if I do this again.

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    @joncard, aren't NASA and China doing exactly the same? Why would they send yours, not theirs drive? They have more resources from the beginning and they are conducting their own research, and engineering for years now - why do you thing they would send something constructed in your kitchen?

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      @6a6b6c: I am not aware that they have plans to do it. I have spoken with a former NASA center head and he said he was interested in launching one just to see if it would work and he couldn't get the science teams to agree to work on it. Eagleworks is a bit outside of normal NASA channels, and I don't know if they have plans to launch one into space. I have spoken to some people that are pretty upset that NASA is spending money on such a "far-fetched" idea.

      That may change now that the Chinese claim to have built one and verified it in space.

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    @joncard are you going to establish some kind of consortium with people familiar with physic, astronomy, and with experience in satellites manufacture? Or are you goin' to working alone?? There's a bunch of young, brilliant and innovative people, students, that have got a bit more of experience in that field. They've worked in similar student projects, and would love to participate and share their knowledge for free. I think it would be helpful to have team of people with different viewpoint.

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      @gleorn: I would absolutely welcome any volunteers. I am trying to get the code on Github.com and working with Autodesk Fusion 360 to make the hardware editable in collaboration. I am willing to use any funds I raise to fund other groups that are closer to launch than I am, and I am willing to bring on people that are interested. I am well aware that the project is moving much slower than it needs to because I keep having to learn things!

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    Dear @joncard How do you evaluate/rate our chances in exploration of our solar system (and beyond) considering the dangers of cosmic and solar radiation and our (still) underwhelming space drive technology?

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    @joncard: Thank you kindly for your reponse, personally I think genetical engineering and better shielding technology is as important to the space exploration as drive technology is. I mean it does not matter much if we can develop an effective drive for interstellar travel when our astronauts will die during the journey. Human race is not yet ready for space colonization being it Mars or other planets/solar systems, we need to make ourselves much better in terms of biology.

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    @joncard In which way it could be controlled from Earth? How about latency?

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      @lpkm: My goal is to use the amateur radio bands and either contribute or leverage SatNOGS (https://satnogs.org/) to handle communication. I want to have two-way communication to get telemetry out and to send commands in. I haven't looked up latency, but I don't think it's much. It's only 200 miles or so to the ISS, when it is overhead.

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    @joncard

    1. Will it have practical impact, or you make it 4fun only for testing its properties without any serious aim in sight?
    2. Can you make emdrive better in some way? I know there is issue with extremely low power of this engine. Do you have some idea what kind of improvements you can apply to emdrive?

    Sorry if my questions are silly.

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      @Phallusimpudicus: No, they aren't silly. I am not sure if I can make it better, but I do know some of the scientific organizations that have made them were not focused on getting the most possible thrust they could. I think I am going to have to, so maybe I will make it better.

      I do want to do things with this engine. The first step, though, is to convince people that it can work, otherwise I won't have any customers. :) It would not be right to ask people to fund my dream of a business, so I want this project to be open-source, and for everyone to see for science.

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    @joncard: if you don't understand how the new version works then... well, welcome to the club :) do you have any news about it's progress? In theory such a device would be a scientific breakthrough allowing us to explore solar system and beyond...

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    What are your qualifications in this field? Any degrees, scientific articles? What's your workshop equipment?

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      @PranieMuzgu: Not many formal qualifications in the field. A couple of articles on space-related, but not engineering, subjects. I have been volunteering and working in aerospace advocacy, and my background is in engineering (Computer Science), so I know a lot of the practical considerations of satellite building and have a pretty deep bench of resources to ask for help when I need it. I work in a place called the Artisans Asylum (www.artisansasylum.com), which has pretty decent tools that I've been using for the project.

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    @joncard why are doing ama on wykop? reddit have more public and socialite, on reddit you could gain more fonds
    anyway is even possible to creer this engine at home?

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    @joncard

    What is the amount of thrust you expect to get?

    How are you going to measure it on Earth?

    What is the cost of launch and waiting time?

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      @dzikiknur: I expect, if everything goes well, about 10 mN of force, which is about the weight of a popcorn kernel in Earth gravity. The most reliable way of measuring it, to my mind, is to partner with a radio telescope or something like that and measure the doppler effect as it accelerates. This means the thrust has to be more than a certain amount (that I forget right now) in order to detect it, so the cavity needs to be pretty well developed.

      NanoRacks has a list price of $80,000/U to launch from the Internation Space Station, for a launch cost estimate of $240,000. I would prefer that, because it is a well known orbit that I expect lots of systems to be able to work with. If I have to go up to 6U, there have been some articles suggesting that a good estimate is $40,000/U, which would still get me to $240,000, but that is probably as a secondary cargo on someone else's satellite launch, and I suspect that would be much more complicated.

      I don't know how long it will be until I launch. Things are moving pretty slowly because my fundraising efforts have not yet been very successful. Once I work that out, I expect things will pick up.

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    Komentarz usunięty przez autora

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      @Grzesiek_astronaut: Fairly easy, compared to most projects like this. Easier than a rocket, which is like plumbing which explodes, and the Woodward Effect stuff, which I imagine will require tuning specific LC circuits to individual resonating crystals. I'm learning metal spinning/spin forming/whatever you call it, and it ends up pretty straightforward to make new cavities. What's holding things up is just 1. Copper is expensive, and 2. I'm insisting on making my forms out of steel instead of wood so they will be more reproducible. That's driving the cost up and it takes longer to build up enough cash.

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    @joncard: Some say that EmDrive may be "explained" as drive interacting with Earth magnetic field. In this case sending it to the low Earth orbit doesn't exclude this hyphothesis. Are you consider about it? / Or maybe that hyphotesis is already dead now? (i'm not up to date)

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      @ale_fuks: I do not think it is "dead" per se, but the Eagleworks team did a great deal of work with magentic suppression to try to rule this out. I will have to look again to see how much this explained or didn't explain, but in the end it will matter, but not much to me. One of the biggest things we can use it for in the next 5 years is satellite maintenance, orbital debris cleanup, or asteroid mining (potentially, once the asteroid has been brought close to Earth). All of that takes place in the Earth's magnetic field, so it would still be a major step forward.

      For the purposes of the experiment, it could be important. We should be able to calculate what the magnetic field's influence should be and see if the device behaved that way. To satisfy that, we would have to have 2 cavities at right angles to each other, one as a null test and the other in line with the magnetic field, and see if they produce different thrusts. I'm not sure there's room for that.

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    1. How are you planning to communicate with the satellite and control it?
    2. Are you planning to build just one EM resonator or multiple ones to control movement in any direction.
    3. Are you planing to build in redundancy in the system?
    4. Has anybody tested if the rapsbery pi, li po battery, magnetron and other components you are planing to use work in space?

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      @scalony: 1. I am planning on using the amateur frequency bands for communication back and forth, and I would like to either contribute to or utilize SatNOGS (https://satnogs.org/), but I am not sure yet.

      2. Just one, I think. There is not a lot of room for more.
      3. Extensive redundancy in the control systems and electronics. Possibly too much. :) I am experimenting with a version of multiple Raspberry Pis that are running a Hadoop cluster. This will help with damage, but also with segmentation faults in a high radiation environment.
      4. Nope. That will be a fun process. I hope to work with MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), which is just down the street, to see if they have a vacuum chamber or radiation chamber to see how this all works.

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    @joncard: There are some rumors that NASA test EmDrive on X37-B :) But, as I say, that are maybe only rumors.

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    We're getting towards the kind of thing that I'm not sure about with regards to regulations for exporting arms. The US government considers anything space related to be a weapon, so I'm trying to stick to published stuff.

    @joncard: Have you actually had any success with further development of this technology or are you just trying to replicate the original EM drive? In the second case, I highly doubt that American ITAR forbids discussing details of... British technology.

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      @medevacs: I am not sure. The law is pretty vague, probably intentionally. Im sticking to published stuff in this AMA, and speculation or plans, but staying away from actual pictures of what I'm doing right now. Maybe it's not necessary, but that's what I'm trying to do.

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    Do you do that like yourself or you work in some company?

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      @donn_pedro: Right now, it's just me. I work in a makerspace called the Artisan's Asylum, which is like a communal machine shop. There are a lot of very good engineers here, since I'm in Boston, so when I have questions I can find answers. I could not do it otherwise.

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    Can we us it for attitude and orbit control already, or not yet (not enough N/W) ?

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    I am planning on a 3U CubeSat, though it is looking like it will go up to 6U

    @joncard: What is cost of launch 3U and 6U CubeSat?

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      @kwanty: A company called NanoRacks has a list price of $80,000 / U to launch a CubeSat from the International Space Station. I would prefer this, because I would expect there is a lot more support for communicating and working with that orbit and nearby ones. However, there are other estimates that put the cost at $40,000 / U if you go as a secondary payload to another satellite. I would prefer not to because this seems more complicated and more prone to mission failure, but it means I have been keeping my launch cost estimate at $240,000, and if funding does not go far enough, I will find another ride.

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    The distance between reflectors in cavity must be multiply of half of the wave length. So when you use 2.45GHz wave this determines distance between reflectors to be 6.1cm. This is relatively large size so potentially by switching to higher frequency you can reduce the dimensions of the device and fit into smaller unit

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      @scalony: Absolutely true. My main concern for selecting a frequency was just that it was widely used in common devices, from Wi-Fi to microwave ovens. It makes it easier to work with the more standardized it is, and 6.1cm fit inside the CubeSat standard. The design moved out from there.

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    @joncard: Could you tell something more about this CubeSate? What orbit? Power supply (EmDrive need more power than you can obtain from PV)? If EmDrive will work how you can verify it? And what about communication? one way, two ways? Any telemetry?

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      @kwanty: The thrust is in the range of 10 mN/kW, so substantial power would be required to produce enough acceleration to detect it from Earth, which is something I want to do. This would mean very large solar panels (the average solar flux is about 1.3 kW per square meter, less panel inefficiencies, etc) and also complex charging circuits that I did not think were worth spending time on. If the device can turn on, run for 2 minutes, and then fall out of the sky, that will have to be enough.

      I am planning on two-way communication using the amateur wavelengths. Beyond some initial estimates of whether the frame of the cubesat would be an adequate antenna, I have not pursued that in detail yet. For a ground station, I have been looking at SatNOGS (https://satnogs.org/), but it has not really gotten past brain storming yet.

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    @joncard I think he knows about chinese success

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    How long have you been collecting money for this project? As I see on YouTube, Project Introduction was posted nearly a year ago. How much have you rised so far? And why do you asking Poles for help?

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      @Wunderwafel: I have been at this for a while. So far, I haven't given the fundraising focus it deserves, so it hasn't raised much. A volunteer suggested this site had people interested in this, so I was happy to do this.

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    Do you think that it is possible to achieve Warp drive for humanity? According to me Em-drive is the first step.

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    How can you make device better - more effective, when nobody knows why it really works ?
    Does the size matter, or this is rather related to power source ?

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      @NoComments: It is just a matter of trying. There are a few models that are proposing how it works, and there is usually something in the model that indicates how to make it better. So far, they do not disagree what would make it better: make the big end bigger and the small end as small as you can without breaking it, and polish the sides as much as possible. Other than that, there are a couple of suggestions that different groups have suggested, like making one plate spherical; Roger Shawyer's patent on the second generation drive suggested that and made an interesting explanation on why it should work better.

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    @joncard What kind of power supply do you want to use to power up emdrive in space?

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      @QBA__: I am looking at using a LiPo battery right now, like is used in drones. I'm not totally sure that will work; a friend of mine took one apart (strongly not recommended for people that want to keep all of their fingers) and I think there is a lot of liquid inside. I will need to see if it can survive vacuum and what its lowest temperature can be, but it at least shows that a battery is capable of producing enough wattage for this to work.

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    @joncard: Thanks for the answers. So, overall, would you say it's a cheap/easy design? I mean, on the surface it seems light years simpler than a, say, ion thruster. Are there any catches? Such as:

    Does the microwave source have to be place with NASA-grade precision?
    Does the surface of the wals have to be ultrasmooth, etc.?

    What is actually the hardest thing in doing it, based on your current understanding? What will eat up most of the money? What's your biggest bad scenario, from a purely engineering POV?

    (Sorry for bombarding you so much, treat it all as a single question.)

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      @LukaszLamza: It is definitely easier than a rocket or experimenting with the Woodward effect. Right now, the most expensive thing is buying copper and steel (which I use for the forms to bend the copper around).

      I don't THINK that the source needs to be tightly placed. I think the resonance characteristics of the chamber will fix most problems. But, yes, the walls need to be much smoother than I have gotten them so far. I have a Q of 50 (which is a measure of how well it resonates) and I do not see this working with less than 10,000 or preferably more. Learning to polish copper, all day, every day.

      My big fear from an engineering point of view is that it will shake itself apart during launch. Or that I cannot get it to work at all. Or if it gets to orbit and doesn't turn on or the battery explodes. Just failing to show acceleration, so long as everything is working right, is not really bad; that's what we are putting it up to find out.

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    @joncard: OK, fair enough. So, after we've established and have it in writing that you're a reasonable man( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°), do you have a private opinion on how it works?

    Let me break this down a bit.
    1. Does the actual shape of the cavity seem to matter? You mentioned that the EM field configuration inside it has been numerically modelled; do you think that, for instance, the spatial arrangement of vortices might matter?
    2. Does the material the walls are made of matter much? Are surface effects being suspects?

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      @LukaszLamza: I have no opinion on how it works. I am trying to consider all theories and checking each design against all of them. When I get to producing thrust, I will be able to compare what I am getting to what each thing predicted, and we will see.

      1. The shape does seem to matter. I am not sure why the shape matters in the NASA Eagleworks theory, but they seem to have tested different shapes and they still make it a frustum. And, yes, the spatial arrangements of the vortices do matter. NASA Eagleworks and Roger Shawyer both say that some "modes" of resonance produce better thrust than others. and NASA Eagleworks says specifically that TM modes work better than TE modes (it works better when the electrical fields go from plate to plate instead of side-to-side). It just is not clear why that should be; there's is the only theory that would explain that.
      2. The material matters because in order for the waves to resonate in the chamber, the walls must be highly conductive or else the microwaves will not reflect well. They need to be something with high conductivity, like copper or silver, and they cannot have tarnish on them (copper oxide is a semiconductor and will not reflect the waves well). They should also be polished very smooth or the electrical current that is needed to reflect the waves will use energy going around the obstacles, creating small resistances. This seems to be part of Shawyer's second generation engines; by making the walls superconducting, he gets rid of all (or most) of the resistance that bleeds the energy resonating inside into heat.

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    The way I see it there are two separate issues:
    a) a (potentially, now pretty convincingly) working unit that generates thrust;
    b) physical interpretations of its principle of use, including wacky ones.

    I'm not expert, but I would guess that if you are an engineer trying to get funding to make something that works, you would actually stay as far as possible from B. You cited McCulloch... which is pretty dangerous for someone who might want to convince the world that this is a serious thing and you are not a kook.

    So two questions:
    1. What is your honest reaction to the 'EMdrive revolutionizes physics' frenzy?
    2. Do you have a plan on how not be treated as a kook? Are you a kook? ( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)

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      @LukaszLamza: I think you are exactly right. I am not trying to get too involved with any particular theory. What I want to know is "does it work?" I suspect that even if I knew how it worked, I could not convince anyone because I do not have the right degrees and work place.

      Yes, McCulloch is pretty fringe. There is just something nagging at me that this is such a strange phenomenon that the explanation will have to have a minimum strangeness in order to explain it. A more conventional explanation would have presented itself, if one fit.

      For your "real" questions: 1. I do not know. As Nassim Taleb says, do not get confused between the map and the terrain. If it revolutionizes physics, then it is just our understanding that it overturned; physics is not the one that changed. 2. I am used to being treated as a kook. I was once the Executive Director of a group called the Space Frontier Foundation, which advocates for policies and changes that support space settlement. We were/are the "radicals" of space policy, even going so far as to suggest that the International Space Station should be supplied by private companies. It is hard to say. Maybe I am a kook, but I try not to be.

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    I think the whole idea of building an EMDrive by individual or small group of enthusiasts is simply unrealistic or it can be deemed as a wishful thinking. The true fact of the matter is that, if you have to make a campaign to raise money, then it's more than obvious that you don't have enough human/intelectual resources to start this project.

    Just be realistic, the whole idea of EMdrive is something that is yet to be discovered by group of serious scientist from all around the world, and you're telling people that you, as an independent engineer can make it work ? xD

    Sounds like a scam to me.

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      @brylant_brylant: I disagree, obviously. There are lots of things that have been discovered or worked on by individuals, and the engineering and machining of an EMDrive is really pretty easy to do, relatively speaking. That's one of the reasons that I am working on it instead of something like the Woodward Effect, which looks really hard to make.

      I think you will also be surprised at how human people are that work in big agencies and companies. It might be obvious that Lockheed/Martin or Boeing should be working on this, but it is not clear who in LM or Boeing would see it as their job to work on it. Groups like NASA have to answer to the US Congress on how they spend their money, and even though it is pretty backwards, it can be difficult for them to justify spending money on things that might not work rather than large, visible projects that they are sure they can make work, like a space telescope or something like that.

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    I think that I can work with a modified Raspberry Pi board.

    @joncard: Definitely you need to test electronic in vacuum chamber and vibration table. RPi is quite sophisticating piece of electronics, it will be prone to radiation (flash and CPU) and probably do not survive in vacuum :( It it's possible you should use more simple uC, something like Arduino (Atmega uC).

    There are a few OpenSource nanosat projects: http://librecube.net/, https://upsat.gr/, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ArduSat, etc.... You should take advantage of their knowledge about microcontrolers in space ;-)

    Anyway, get luck :) I have experience in Digital Signal Processing, if you encounter problems with the DSP I can help :)

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    My biggest worry is being shaken apart during launch.

    @joncard: This can be simulated via FEA for the design phase, and also later experimentally tested on the ground.

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    @joncard: are you sure that using fully featured non realtime OS like Linux in space as a primary control system is a good idea? Just like you written above there is a possibility of unwanted reboots, segfaults etc.
    Have you considered using smaller embedded system with RTOS, and the RaspberryPi as auxilary device. In case of unwanted reboot it will get back to work much faster than "big OS" like Linux.

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      @QBA__: You are definitely right about that.The biggest issue I have is that, in order to "tune" the chamber, there needs to be something capable of a Fourier transform, pretty fast and in real time. If I work with a Hadoop cluster of Raspberry Pis, then most will be on most of the time, and I will be able to distribute the work load. FFT has not been implemented as a Map-Reduce algorithm, but I have an idea about that I want to try. But in order for the sampling rate to be high enough for the frequency I am working with, I definitely would have to go outside anything easy to order or cheap to buy. I want to see what I can get done with the Raspberry Pi.

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    @joncard: hello, I've read that you are going to try doppler effect method in measuring acceleration. I have no idea if its accuracy is enough, and I'd like to propose another method for you to consider.

    The spring pendulum scale is a device used on ISS to accurately measure astronaut's mass in microgravity. It's mass is strictly connected with resonant oscillation frequency.

    My idea is to build such frame, in which you could 'hang' your device on a near lossless springs and then excite oscillation in resonant frequency region by reapetidly turning your device on and off. In result, oscillations should build up over time to effectively measure its amplitude.

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      @pierzak: I have been trying to get talks going to test it aboard the space station first; it's a matter of where I can get funding or grants. That sounds like a good setup to put on the station itself.

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    @joncard what about the second gen of the engine which produces 1000x more of thrust. What is your view on that?

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      @osters: I am very interested to see it work. I am not sure I understand Mr. Shawyer's explanation of it, but it does seem as if it would work much better. Working with YBCO and liquid nitrogen is a bit more than I can take on for this version of the project, though.

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    @joncard: What about the theory that the EmDrive emits paired photons that are out of phase?

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      @wrecekrzepki: I've seen that one. I try not to rule anything out, but I have a few questions about it. The trouble is that the EMDrive performs better than shining a laser in a focused direction, so it seems unlikely that further filtering the photons so that only the ones that strike the plate in perfect opposite phases would perform even better than that. It's just a guess, but there's not much better I can do. I keep meaning to reach out to those researchers, but keep forgetting.

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    When you can build breaking physic law engine you can build more efficient solar panels :D

    @MagicznyHubert: I can fully agree, however this thing seems to be working, according to some recent medial news and a few papers I have seen. Moreover not braking the physics law, at least according to papers and patent of Shawyer, the inventor.

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      @dzikiknur: That's definitely the problem. The best I can do with any kind of attainable budget is this: the ride to the ISS has a pressurized compartment; I want to go in there. The ISS is room temperature. Once it is launched, My hope is to be able to run a small heater until it is ready to try activating it. Once it's on, there will be no problems with too little heat. Maybe having a heater will require the finished device be filled with foam; I'm not sure yet.

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    @joncard: ok, so can you estimate your chances? I mean, it's something so complex that you can't be 100% sure that your project will actually work out flawlessly.

    I honestly feel that you're too optimistic, and the entire project has slim chances to be succesful.

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      @brylant_brylant: I think it is better than you would think, but then you said I was too optimistic. My biggest worry is being shaken apart during launch. I am sure I can test the electronics in high radiation before launching (somewhere around MIT there must be a nuclear reactor, right?) and keeping a little heat on doesn't seem to hard. And I have the benefit of knowing people at companies like NanoRacks that have assured me that this kind of thing really is done all the time.

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    Komentarz usunięty przez autora

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    @joncard: I was about to ask something similar. Can electronics be previously submerged in some kind of elastic insulating resin to keep it isolated after it solidifies?

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    @joncard: what is going to happen to circuit boards, if you leave internal space dry and in vacuum? No water to freeze, no pressure to rip the cage apart.

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      @guilmonn: There's always some water, and there's always some pressure. And if I leave a hole to ventilate it, then moisture and air can get in. It is a serious problem. My intention now is to leave it ventilated to the outside, and seal the electronics in plastic, like those cheap toys to come in vacuum formed packaging. I can't remember the name of it, but it can be done.

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    Komentarz usunięty przez autora

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    @joncard: Hello. The first question that comes to my mind. What prompted you to visit niche web-site, on some secluded area of the internet and texting amidst Poles?

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    @joncard: You can write on this engine "Pozdrowienia dla całego Świata od Jakuba eS?"?

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    @joncard: you should try yandex translator it work better then google for slavic languages

    just sayin :D

    https://translate.yandex.com

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    Zakop za brak języka polskiego i za to, że chińczycy już to testują na orbicie.

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      @marcin_net: I am very excited about the Chinese test in orbit. I do not know how much that is going to convince people in the US; there are a lot of people that do not trust the Chinese space program. They think it is too secretive and suspect they may be lying. It does not seem likely to me, but that is the worry.

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    I don't know how to do the verification, but here's the picture I took.

    @joncard: ugly as hell, it may be true. By the way, could you post some photo with your experimental stand/components for verification?

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      @dzikiknur: We're getting towards the kind of thing that I'm not sure about with regards to regulations for exporting arms. The US government considers anything space related to be a weapon, so I'm trying to stick to published stuff. There isn't much to see, anyway. I have one cavity that I have gotten a resonance in, and I am working on the tools and things I need to do a full power test, like an experiment controller on a Raspberry Pi and Faraday cage for safety, but there isn't much to see right now.

      I will agree I am not much to look at.

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